Beloved Curve — Using Double Exposures, Sarah Amy Fishlock Reflects on the Cycle of Life

Beloved Curve — Using Double Exposures, Sarah Amy Fishlock Reflects on the Cycle of Life

Too often the humankind puts itself at the center of any reflection on the meaning of life, but the truth is our planet—not to speak about the entire universe—has existed since long before we came on to the scene, and will probably outlive us. The beauty of Beloved Curve, a recent conceptual photography series by 31 year-old Scottish photographer Sarah Amy Fishlock, is the simplicity with which it connects the existential theme of the incessant cycle of life to her grieving process for her father's death through the intelligent use of double exposures.

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Japan Cherry Blossoms – Drone Lapse Times

Japan Cherry Blossoms - Drone Lapse Times

A few months ago Jack Johnston was asked to film a series of lapse time shots of the Cherry Blossom trees in Japan for a BBC Springwatch Special. After months of testing and working out the kinks in the process, this is a selection of shots that featured in the final show.

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Journey Through 100 of Japan’s Finest Gardens

Journey Through 100 of Japan’s Finest Gardens

Marc Peter Keane in an American landscape architect who spent almost 20 years in Kyoto practicing landscape design. In fact, he was the first foreigner to receive a working visa as a landscape architect. Now back stateside, Keane maintains an office in upstate New York where he designs Japanese gardens for both public and private spaces. It’s hard to think of a better person to serve as a personal guide through 100 of Japan’s Finest Gardens.

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Antarctica’s Blood Falls: not so mysterious, but still freaky as heck

Antarctica's Blood Falls: not so mysterious, but still freaky as heck

You may have seen headlines proclaiming that the great mystery of Antarctica's "Blood Falls" has finally been solved. That's a little silly, because the big mystery—the question of why blood-like bright red liquid oozes out of the otherwise white surface of Taylor Glacier—hasn't been all that mysterious for some time. Two years ago, a study suggested that the water, a salty brine full of interesting microbial life and colored by a high level of iron, seems to come up from an underground waterway that connects visible lakes on the surface.

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