PETA to pay family $49k for euthanizing child’s Chihuahua

PETA to pay family $49k for euthanizing child’s Chihuahua

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals is going to pay a Virginia family tens of thousands of dollars after it was found that the animal activists euthanized a 9-year-old girls’ Chihuahua well before the state’s five-day waiting period. Wilber Zarate sued PETA for taking the dog, which was at a mobile home park in Norfolk, unleashed and unattended, and for putting the dog down before the end of the state’s five-day mandatory grace period, The Associated Press reported.

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Leading elephant conservationist shot dead in Tanzania

Leading elephant conservationist shot dead in Tanzania

The head of an animal conservation NGO who had received numerous death threats has been shot and killed by an unknown gunman in Tanzania. Wayne Lotter, 51, was shot on Wednesday evening in the Masaki district of the city of Dar es Salaam. The wildlife conservationist was being driven from the airport to his hotel when his taxi was stopped by another vehicle. Two men, one armed with a gun opened his car door and shot him.

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Mystery of how first animals appeared on Earth ‘solved by scientists’

Mystery of how first animals appeared on Earth 'solved by scientists'

New research has shed fresh light on how animals first appeared on the Earth. It is a story spanning hundreds of millions of years, of entire mountain ranges ground to dust by vast glaciers that once covered the planet and of dramatic climate change that ushered in a new biological age. Life on Earth was dominated by simple bacteria up until about 650 million years ago when more complex forms of life suddenly took over.

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Fukushima scientists: World’s oceans now completely uninhabitable.

Fukushima scientists: World’s oceans now completely uninhabitable.

The situation is entirely too catastrophic in magnitude for humans to control it. Fishing industries in the region have been toppled by contamination reports ran on fish. And now there are even studies providing evidence that fish off the coast of the United States and Canada are adversely affected. A scientist named Ken Buesseler claims that the radiation levels currently found in fish may not be at levels toxic to humans. But many scientists say there isn’t such a thing as “safe levels” of radioactive material consumption.

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California scientists push to create massive climate-research programme

California scientists push to create massive climate-research programme

California has a history of going it alone to protect the environment. Now, as US President Donald Trump pulls back on climate science and policy, scientists in the Golden State are sketching plans for a home-grown climate-research institute — to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars per year.

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These Drones Can Plant 100,000 Trees in One Day

These Drones Can Plant 100,000 Trees in One Day

Billions of trees are felled each year, according to the Rainforest Action Network, and planting a tree requires more time and effort than cutting one down. That makes keeping up with deforestation rates challenging for conservationists. The minds behind one tech startup think they can speed up global tree-planting efforts by taking the burden off humans and placing it on drones.

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Lost to Science for 60 Years, Táchira Antpitta Is Rediscovered in Venezuelan Andes

Lost to Science for 60 Years, Táchira Antpitta Is Rediscovered in Venezuelan Andes

Jhonathan Miranda never expected to be into birds. But when the Venezuelan biologist got a job at a bird lab as a university student, he set his mind to learning as much as he could about the class Aves. As he organized trips around the country, one particular species lodged in his mind: the Táchira Antpitta, a round, leggy brown bird a little longer than a pencil.

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